Wednesday, August 27, 2014

How to get back hidden files with CMD

Click on "Start" --> Run --> then type cmd and click on OK.

Assuming your pendrive is G, enter the following command:

attrib -h -r -s /s /d g:\*.*

You can copy the above command then right click in the Command Prompt and paste it.
NB: Replace the letter g with your flash drive letter.

Now check for your files in the pen drive.


Thursday, June 5, 2014

How to Turn Off File Sharing

How to Turn Off File Sharing


If it's not necessary for you to share folders on your machine with other users, turn off file sharing. 
Otherwise, if you need to permit certain users access to certain folders on your machine, you can set up permissions to allow limited, password-protected file sharing.

Turn off File Sharing

  1. On the Start menu, click Control Panel, and then click Network and Sharing Center.
  2. In the panel on the left, click Change advanced sharing settings, and then click the arrow next toHome or Work.
  3. Check the following settings:
    • Network Discovery: Off
    • File and Printer Sharing: Off
    • Public Folder Sharing: Off
    • File Sharing Connections: Use 128-bit encryption...
  4. Click Save Changes.


Even with file sharing and public folder sharing turned off, you can still share folders, if necessary. For more information, see the Limit the Permissions for Shared Folders procedure.

Limit the Permissions for Shared Folders

With file sharing and public folder sharing turned off, you can still share folders. Use this procedure to turn on password protection for shared folders. After you turn on password protection for shared folders, only users who have an account and a password can access shared folders on your machine. You'll need to set up a user account and password for each person to whom you want to grant sharing permissions.
  1. On the Start menu, click Control Panel, and then click Network and Sharing Center.
  2. In the panel on the left, click Change advanced sharing settings, and then click the arrow next toHome or Work.
  3. Under Public Folder Sharing, click Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can read and write files in the Public folders.
  4. Click Save Changes.
If you're on a departmental network, consult with your local technical support provider to set up accounts and passwords for shared folders.

Create a Shared Folder

When password protected sharing is on, only people who have a user account and password on the computer can access shared files, printers, and Public folders.
  1. Right-click the folder you want to share.
  2. Select Share with and then select Specific people.


  3. Click the arrow and select a user name.
    If the user isn't in the list, you may need to create an account for them. See Create a New Account: Windows 7.
  4. Click Share.
    In the File Sharing box, you'll see a list of all shared folders.
  5. Click Done.

Stop Sharing a Folder

  1. Right-click the folder.
  2. Select Share with and then select Nobody.

Saturday, May 3, 2014

Speed up Mac OS X Leopard


After a year and a half of running Mac OS X Snow Leopard things have become extraordinarily slow on my MacBook Pro. After a quick googling on the subject of how to speed up Mac OS X Leopard I have decided to write my own brief tutorial on a handful of things you can do to effectively increase the performance of OS X. This is meant as a programmer’s quick reference guide so if you are not technically savvy you may want to google “performance tune mac os x” for more verbose explanations.

13 Mac Performance Tuning Applications and Tips

  1. Run the Mac OS X disk repair utility location in Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility and then run repair disk permissions. See this article on the repair functions of the disk utility.
  2. Download and run Monolingual to remove all the additional languages that are built into OS X by default and you are likely to never use. I removed everything except English, Spanish, German and French since those are core languages on websites I sometimes frequent.
  3. Download and run XSlimmer to remove all unnecessary PPC (PowerPC) code from Universal Binaries. Only use this if you are using an Intel based Mac. Additionally it is worthwhile noting that I had problems with Photoshop after slimming the application, so perhaps avoid using XSlimmer on CS3 or CS4.
  4. Download and run OnyX.Run the daily, weekly and monthly scripts. Clear out all log files.
  5. Removing unnecessary login items by going to System Preferences > Accounts > Login Items. Note that in order to actually remove a login item you need to select the item and then hit the minus button at the bottom of the preferences screen.
  6. Even though Mac OS X has a journaled filesystem that should automatically handle defragmentation on the fly, it doesn’t do a great job of keeping the drive from becoming fragmented. iDefrag.solves these problems and more, by defragmenting and optimizing your Mac’s filesystem at boot time. All you have to do is restart your computer, run the iDefrag boot DVD and it will defragment the entire hard-drive. I noticed a substantial performance boost (I would say up to around 20%) after using this.
  7. Minimize by using the scale effect by going to System Preferences > Dock and changing the default from the Genie effect to the Scale effect. Also you can uncheck “animate opening applications” to boost performance.
  8. Ensure you have a minimum of 10% disk space available so that OS X can run effectively. If you don’t have this much space free try using GrandPerspective to determine what is using space on your hard drive and what you might be able to delete.
  9. Remove fonts that you don’t use. You can do this by going to the finder and removing fonts from your home folder > library > fonts.
  10. Turn off Universal Access by navigating to System Preferences > Universal Access and turn off anything you’re not using.
  11. Turn off Bluetooth by navigating to to System Preferences > Bluetooth.
  12. Turn off Internet Sharing by navigating to to System Preferences > Sharing > Internet.
  13. Check the Activity Monitor located in Applications > Utilities > Activity Monitor to see if there is anything running that is consuming processing or memory resources. This should go without saying.

Command Line Performance Tuning Tips

  1. You can speed up TCP connections by opening the terminal.app and typing pico /etc/sysctl.conf and adding the following lines to the file:
    net.inet.tcp.mssdflt=1460
    net.inet.tcp.sendspace=262144
    net.inet.tcp.recvspace=262144
    net.inet.udp.recvspace=74848
    net.inet.udp.maxdgram=65535
  2. You can speed up SSH connections by opening the terminal.app and typing pico ~/.ssh_config and adding the following lines to the file:
    host *
    controlmaster auto
    controlpath /tmp/ssh-%r@%h:%p
    It should be noted here that this may cause some glitches as I have run into some odd controlmaster errors after implementing this command. You can always try it and remove the code if it gives you problems.
  3. Disable dashboard by opening up the terminal.app and running the command:
    defaults write com.apple.dashboard mcx-disabled -boolean YES
    and then run killall dock to restart the dock.
  4. To optimize firefox’s tab/bookmarks/cache databases on OSX, close firefox, open terminal.app and run #cd ~/Library/Caches/Firefox/Profiles; for i in */*.sqlite; do sqlite3 $i VACUUM;done; cd ~/Library/Application\ Support/Firefox/Profiles; for i in */*.sqlite; do sqlite3 $i VACUUM;done;